Feb 252013
 

Iron fences have the best of all worlds. They are strong and sturdy, providing excellent security where it’s needed, and they can also be designed as extremely pleasing to look at, which can only enhance your property from an aesthetic point of view.

It’s a sad fact that we live in an age when not everyone can be trusted. For this reason, everyone owes it to themselves to stay vigilant and do whatever is necessary to discourage intruders. Chain link fencing, for example, can be very efficient in this respect, but it lacks the simple pleasing effectiveness of well designed ornamental iron fencing.



Properly constructed iron fences and gates are constructed as essentially one piece. The individual pieces are welded together, and this means they are very difficult to take apart. In the case of wooden or vinyl fencing, the finials and pickets can easily be dismantled with nothing more than just a simple screwdriver. Welded panels make the kind of security fencing that allows you to sleep deeply and soundly at night.

Modern wrought iron railings

Of course, most modern wrought iron railing is not actually constructed from so called true wrought iron. The wrought iron term stems from a time before steel was properly discovered and developed, when iron was wrought, or worked, by hand. The raw iron metal was extremely ductile and malleable, which allowed it to be worked into elaborate and decorative scrolls, twists and sweeping curves. The result was something that achieved both beauty and security at the same time.

Today’s modern wrought iron railing is actually made from mild steel. It is a steel with a relatively low carbon composition, which means it is reasonably ductile and malleable, though perhaps not as much as real iron. It lacks the flaws that wrought iron has, which is a result of flux and other impurities in the metal, giving it a distinctive textured look. However, you can often see this texture effect added to mild steel fencing and gates that are deliberately made to appear like original wrought iron.

Custom made wrought iron fencing

An iron ornamental fence can of course be fully custom made to a customer’s individual needs and taste. Some custom gate and fence systems are so beautifully and thoughtfully designed that they can truly be considered works of art. This in no way should detract from the security properties of the fence or gate. It can, though, make your premises look much more friendly and homely, but at the same time still pose a serious problem to any would-be intruder.

There is, of course the added cost of a real prefab steel or custom fabricated iron fence, as opposed to cheaper alternatives, such as chain link fencing ornamental structures. However, most people would agree that iron fencing is quite simply the best, and if that’s what you want, or that’s what your commercial or industrial project requires, then you have to be prepared to admit it, and pay the difference.

Is it really worth the extra you will pay? In a word, yes. This type of fencing is superior in so many ways. It has very long lasting durability, which only adds to its security qualities, which can give you the peace of mind you deserve.  It also creates an image of strength, security, and stature.

Maintaining a wrought iron fence

It is, of course, necessary to properly maintain your iron fence and any gates you might have. Like all ferrous metals, they will be susceptible to rust over time. For that reason, it is a very good idea to select galvanized steel ornamental fence panels and gates. This galvanized steel fencing should then be finished with a baked on powder coat finish, which are available in many colors.  Ornamental fences made from galvanized steel should not require maintenance for 20 years.

With a little bit of planning, your iron or galvanized steel fence and gates will provide you and your family or business with all the strength and security you need, while looking timeless and elegant for many years to come.

 Posted by at 3:42 pm

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